reviews

 

Eric Sheffer-Stevens

Review 1

“Alaska” ’s sibling in the “Family Reunion” twin bill is a dark rumination on what ruination the science of cloning might wreak on the souls of copies and originals alike. Mr. Stevens commands the stage thrice, as two clones and the “source,” or real, offspring of Salter (Mr. French), a father seized by poor judgment who realizes too late he has replicated his regrets. His direct descendant, Bernard 1, has evolved into an evil twin from parental neglect, while his cloned half-brother, Bernard 2, is an innocent, born of a guilt-ridden father who has shielded him from family secrets. ............... Mr. Stevens’s hat trick of limning each of Salter’s handiwork with a unique gestalt – accented by British intonations that vary just enough to be serviceable – is the kind of high-stakes, fancy footwork on stage that, like gymnastics, is tightly disciplined and fun to watch.

http://townlink.com/odd-couple-families-reunite-hudson-stage/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review 2

The lights come up on Salter (French) and his son Bernard (Eric Sheffer Stevens) in the middle of a heated discussion. Bernard has recently learned there are multiple personages with his exact genetic makeup. He presses his father for answers. Salter is evasive but truths emerge over the course of this and four additional scenes, during which two of Bernard's other "selves" (also played by Stevens) appear.

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To separate the iterations of Bernard, Stevens emits both posh Hugh Grant-like tones and appropriately lower-class phonations. Crucially, he doesn't rely on accent alone and makes skillful use of body language and wardrobe.

http://www.lohud.com/story/entertainment/2014/05/08/hudson-stage-family-reunion-theater/8944959/

 

Review 3

“Family Reunion” is a dark rumination on what ruination the science of cloning might wreak on the souls of copies and originals alike. Mr. Stevens commands the stage thrice, as two clones and the “source,” or real, offspring of Salter (Mr. French), a father seized by poor judgment who realizes too late he has replicated his regrets. .............. Mr. Stevens’s hat trick of limning each of Salter’s handiwork with a unique gestalt – accented by British intonations that vary just enough to be serviceable – is the kind of high-stakes, fancy footwork on stage that, like gymnastics, is tightly disciplined and fun to watch.

http://townlink.com/odd-couple-families-reunite-hudson-stage/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review 4

As a drama, Ms. Churchill’s “A Number” is a study in expertly measured exposition. The first scene begins with a father and son, Salter (Michael Bryan French) and Bernard (Eric Sheffer Stevens), in varying degrees of distress............... Mr. Stevens, whose previous Hudson Stage appearance, in the Michael McKeever comedy “37 Postcards,” was 13 years ago, plays three highly distinct characters. Bernard 1, Bernard 2 and Michael are identical physically but enormously different psychologically. Mr. Stevens, ably directed by Dan Foster, attacks each character with real ferocity, helping charge every encounter in this play with a vibrant, sometimes violent energy.

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2014/05/11/nyregion/a-review-of-family-reunion-in-briarcliff-manor.html?referrer=

 

Review 1

The sharp-tongued Beatrice and her worthy sparring partner Benedick have innocent and naïve counterparts in the pure Hero and the easily duped Claudio. The two couples may be the heart of the play, but an excellent supporting cast gives the comedy some of its darker, more affecting, and most delightfully ridiculous moments. Pascal gives us a deliciously evil Don Juan, ably assisted by Stevens as Borachio.

http://www.stageandcinema.com/2014/06/16/much-ado-public-delacorte/

 

Review 2

"Among the rest of the cast, the particular standout has Brian Stokes Mitchell, who is a most commanding presence as Don Pedro. For those worried they will be deprived of hearing his baritone pipes, fear not; composer David Yazbek has a nice surprise in store. Also especially noteworthy are the Claudio of Jack Cutmore-Scott, David Manis's Antonio (he is also quite fun as Verges) and, surprisingly enough, Eric Sheffer Stevens, as the servant Borachio."

http://www.curtainup.com/muchadopark14.html

 

Review 3

"Among the fine work in smaller roles, John Pankow's playful comic timing animates the buffoonish constable who unwittingly uncovers the treachery. And both Zoe Winters as Hero's lady-in-waiting and Eric Sheffer Stevens as the remorseful servant enlisted to besmirch that good woman have a strong stage presence."

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/ado-nothing-theater-review-712196

 

Review 4

"Faring much better is Pedro Pascal, who made the most of his small arc on Game of Thrones and does the same here as the villainous Don John. He has stage presence to burn and is assured and forthright as a man who feels no pleasure except in thwarting that of others. Similarly Eric Sheffer Stevens makes a strong impression as Borachio, the willing conspirator of Don John and Zoe Winters (so good in An Octaroon) as his love Margaret."

www.huffingtonpost.com

http://www.curtainup.com/muchadopark14.html

Review 1

Most of the main supporting characters -- Albany (Christopher Innvar), Cornwall (Glenn Fleshler), the Fool (Steven Boyer), Kent (Jay O. Sanders) -- fare better, whereas Eric Sheffer Stevens's Edmund is an enigma -- providing little of the villainy or the sexual magnetism that is required. Which brings us to the two performances that do bring distinction to this production -- Clarke Peters as Gloucester and Chukwudi Iwuji as Edgar/Poor Tom. Individually and especially together, they provide the strongest heartbeat in this production, and they are exceptional. So much so that someone seeing this Lear as their first might reasonably wonder why they are not considered the central characters.

http://www.curtainup.com/learpark14.html

 

Review 2

Eric Sheffer Stevens' delivery of Edmund is second to none. His casual wit and charisma endears him to the audience even as his actions horrify. Stevens shines in this role, owning the stage. He gives us an Edmund that cannot be turned away from the moment he is left alone with his audience.

http://entertainmenthour.blogspot.nl/2014/08/king-lear-delacorte-theatre.html

 

Review 3

"Sheffer Stevens as Edmund is also strong; I very much enjoyed his work in Act I as he connives against Gloucester and Edgar."

http://beccaonbroadway.com/2014/08/

 

Review 4

Eric Sheffer Stevens handles the bastard Edmund with a light touch, making his villainy all the more appalling.

http://www.timeout.com/newyork/theater/king-lear-12

 

 

Review 5

"I didn't fully love this production where much of it was good but few things excellent. Oddly, I was most drawn to the actors I was least familiar with like Jessica Collins as Cordelia, Eric Sheffer Stevens as Edmund, and Steven Boyer as Fool."

www.thefilmexperience.net

2014

Family Reunion: A number

May 2 until May 17

Characters: Bernard 1 and 2, Michael Black

Playwright: Caryl Churchill

Director: Dan Foster

Theater Company: Hudson Stage Company

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Much Ado About Nothing

June 3 until July 6

Character: Borachio

Playwright: William Shakespeare

Director: Jack O'Brien

Theater Company: The Public Theater

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

King Lear

July 22 until August 17

Character: Edmund

Playwright: William Shakespeare

Director: Daniel Sullivan

Theater Company: The Public Theater

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